Thursday, September 3, 2009

St. Pius X Catholic Church - Reynoldsburg, Ohio

1051 Waggoner Road - This cool church was built in 1960. Due to the ribs, it reminds me of Space Mountain. I find it interesting how in the 1950's and 60's architecture of all types looked to the future. Everything seems very optimistic. Today we seem to always look back. We seem to suffer from the delusion that everything was better in the past and that we can return to that time. Current architecture certainly reflects this, especially in churches. You can never return to the past, you can only move forward. I wish that more architecture would continue to look forward. Sermon over, amen!















8 comments:

  1. Something seems intimidating, even foreboding, about these sharp angles.

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  3. It is a beautiful church on the inside. I used to attend there - a lifetime ago!

    I have pic but I can't copy it here. Sorry

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  4. Thanks for the comments. I lived within a couple of miles of the church for four years and drove by it often but only got around to taking pictures of it right before I moved out of state. I never had the opportunity to go inside.

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  5. Nice picture of the Church. I am Mike McGee of McGee and Albert, architects for the Church.
    Yes, we were fighting to bring a better and modern architecture to life. We did - for a nice "while'. The design started in a design discussion with my partner, john Albert. I said i wanted it to be inspired by a clam shell -- spreading my fingers to stand on the desk top.
    We had to invent a construction system for the engineer in order to stay in budget. And, I turned the entrance to the parking lot -- so everyone could go to mass by entering the front doors - and design a small "patio" to separate the asphalt from the Church.
    Great memories.
    Mike McGee, retired Columbus architect - now in San Diego, CA.

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    1. Hi Mike! Do you know who designed the stained glass windows and the history/story of the windows?

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    2. I'm back in Ohio again. The windows were designed by a firm in Wisconsin - the only time I "farmed" out stained glass design to someone I didn't know personally. It's supposed to be the story of of Creation. I told the designer I wanted color but also a feeling that the design was floating. He did the work in the Chapel, also. Too heavy; too dark (and too late).Mike McGee

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  6. I think that you accomplished that and so much more! The design makes one feel as though His hands are personally welcoming you here. Beautiful!

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